Google Plus + Dungeons & Dragons: Post #2

Posted 5 years ago by Games

Previously: Post #1 in our Google+ D&D Experiment

Our adventure has officially gotten underway!  The three main characters – Finora the Wolf Slayer (Fighter), Oraine (Ranger) and Gerrex (Cleric) – have met with the head of the largest shipping company in the port city of Enathal, a man by the name of Suzdal Razin.  Razin’s daughter, Kythera, was snatched off the streets along with some of her handmaidens, and thus far, all signs point to the Blood Diamond Clan as the most likely culprits.  Local legend holds that the Clan has a secret mine where they harvest precious gems.  To supply their workforce, rumors say they kidnap unsuspecting citizens to use as disposable slave labor.  Could Kythera have become the latest victim of the Clan’s nefarious operation?  Or is it all just an urban legend meant to add to the Clan’s already dark reputation?  The adventurers are heading to the Clan hall now to look for clues and to meet up with Tyrion the Monk to complete their party.

As someone who hasn’t DM’ed a game in over 20 years, it’s been so great to get back to storytelling.  And thus far, Google+ is holding up pretty well as a method for playing.
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Google Plus + Dungeons & Dragons: Post #1

Posted 5 years ago by Games

As a wee lad, I rolled my fair share of 20-sided dice while battling imaginary monsters at slumber party sessions of Dungeons & Dragons. As with many first gen (or arguably second gen) gamers who started playing after they got their hands on those famous red books, D&D has always informed who I am, but has not always been a driving force in my life.

I lost interest in wizards and warriors in high school, it completely dropped off my radar in college, and I tried to play a campaign with some like-minded dorks in my 20’s, but it never really came back full-force like when I was 12 years old. Instead, I’ve gotten married, became a father, have a full-time job (and a couple of part-time ones, too), so D&D simply cannot be as important to me as it once was. But that doesn’t mean I want D&D completely out of my life, either. And I’m not alone.

Recently there’s been a real resurgence in D&D as older fans have started to feel nostalgic towards gaming. Most of us have kids and playing is not only a great way to spend some quality time with them, but it also gets them off the internet, the iPad/iPod, or to put down their DS, and do something that requires a little bit of imagination and creativity for a change. Some OG gamers who may not have kids simply want to get back to something that was a great excuse to hang out with a group of friends and have some fun. Unfortunately, with my busy lifestyle, I don’t really have time to schedule a live session with my nerdy friends once a week. So, for me anyway, play-by-post is a better solution.
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Google Plus + Dungeons & Dragons: Post #1

Posted 5 years ago by Games

As a wee lad, I rolled my fair share of 20-sided dice while battling imaginary monsters at slumber party sessions of Dungeons & Dragons. As with many first gen (or arguably second gen) gamers who started playing after they got their hands on those famous red books, D&D has always informed who I am, but has not always been a driving force in my life.

I lost interest in wizards and warriors in high school, it completely dropped off my radar in college, and I tried to play a campaign with some like-minded dorks in my 20’s, but it never really came back full-force like when I was 12 years old. Instead, I’ve gotten married, became a father, have a full-time job (and a couple of part-time ones, too), so D&D simply cannot be as important to me as it once was. But that doesn’t mean I want D&D completely out of my life, either. And I’m not alone.

Recently there’s been a real resurgence in D&D as older fans have started to feel nostalgic towards gaming. Most of us have kids and playing is not only a great way to spend some quality time with them, but it also gets them off the internet, the iPad/iPod, or to put down their DS, and do something that requires a little bit of imagination and creativity for a change. Some OG gamers who may not have kids simply want to get back to something that was a great excuse to hang out with a group of friends and have some fun. Unfortunately, with my busy lifestyle, I don’t really have time to schedule a live session with my nerdy friends once a week. So, for me anyway, play-by-post is a better solution.
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Case Closed: Pig Out: Dine Like a Swine!

Posted 5 years ago by Games

If you listened to this week’s episode of Bubble Pipe Theater, you’ll hear me mention a mystery arcade game that my Dad use to have in the Noble Roman’s pizza shop he ran when I was a kid. For years I’ve been trying to remember what this game was called, and hadn’t been able to find anything online about it. All I could remember is that it starred the three little pigs, and that you fought the Big Bad Wolf by throwing junk at him.

After the podcast, I dug around a bit more, and I finally tracked it down (thanks to a thread on Giant Bomb), and it’s called Pig Out: Dine Like a Swine!.

Now, I still consider this a nostalgic victory, but file this under things-I-remember-being-awesome-that-turn-out-to-actually-be-pretty-lame. The gameplay looks horrible, and with those damn pigs constantly yelling “Mine!” it’s hard telling how I ever forgot this game in the first place.

Help Fund a Minecraft Documentary Film

Posted 6 years ago by Games, Movies

Surely you know what Minecraft is. The game maintains a fascinating position as global cultural phenomenon while simultaneously keeping its underground status.

For the uninitiated, Minecraft is a game where you build things. It’s also a game where you are preyed upon by zombies and scary spiders. Part Lego, part horror film, it’s an addictive “little” indie game that has over 4.6 million registered users. Over one million of these users have paid about $20 each to participate. Oh yeah, and it’s existed as a playable Alpha for most of its life.

Filmmakers at 2 Player Productions have begun work on a documentary about Mojang, the Minecraft: The Story of Mojangcompany Minecraft creator Markus “Notch” Persson formed to further development of the game. They’ve released a 20-minute proof-of-concept to help fund the film’s completion.

There’s a Kickstarter campaign to raise the $150,000 necessary to complete the documentary. At the time of this writing, they’re over half way to being fully funded. It’s inevitable that they’ll get there before the Mar. 26 deadline but if you act now, you can be a part of this special project. There are special rewards available to backers at different contribution levels.

Check out their Kickstarter page for more info. If their sample video is any indication, this is going to be a very compelling film worthy of your time—and contribution.